HAE

Isolation-For those who are diagnosed with COVID-19

Isolation: separating an individual who has symptoms or has been diagnosed with COVID-19 from people who are not sick. Separating them from others prevents healthy individuals from being exposed and becoming sick as well.

To report results from rapid at-home COVID-19 tests, please visit this page.

For those who have been exposed to COVID-19

Quarantine: prevents the ongoing spread of the virus to other people by individuals who know they have been exposed or are likely to have been exposed, but do not yet know if they have been infected. It’s a precaution and an effective tool to prevent viral spread since people infected with COVID-19 can be contagious even without having symptoms.

 

Frequently Asked Questions

The following situations are considered a household exposure and contacts should take post-exposure precautions:

  • Close contact with a household member regardless of mask usage who is positive or presumed to be positive in the 2 days prior to their symptoms onset or positive test date (day 0) if asymptomatic and a full 5 days after.
  • Close contact with a household member who is positive or presumed to be positive on days 6-10 after their symptoms starting or positive test if asymptomatic (day 0) and they were unmasked

These guidelines were developed by the CDC for general community exposures (ex: going to the grocery store). Most household situations present a much higher risk of transmission than your average community exposure. There are steps you can take to reduce the risk of exposure to your household contacts during your infectious period. These recommendations do not fully eliminate the risk of exposure.  

  • Stay in a separate room from other household members through the entire 10 day infectious period, if possible.
  • Use a separate bathroom, if possible.
  • Take steps to improve ventilation at home, if possible.
  • Avoid sharing personal household items, like cups, towels, and utensils.
  • Wear a well-fitting mask when you need to be around other people in the household.

The CDC also provides these requirements for isolation that are specific to households:

  • Continue to wear a well-fitting mask around others at home and in public for 5 additional days (day 6 through day 10) after the end of your 5-day isolation period.
  • If you are unable to wear a mask when around others, you should continue to isolate for a full 10 days.
  • Avoid eating around others at home and at work until a full 10 days after your first day of symptoms.

We understand that isolation may not be possible in some households, especially those with young children.

Post-exposure recommendation timelines are based on the last date someone is exposed to someone who is infectious with COVID. When someone lives with someone who is infectious with COVID, they may be continuously exposed until the person with COVID is no longer infectious (their last day of isolation) if they are not able to completely isolate away from the person who is sick.

 In these situations, someone should follow post-exposure precautions such as masking and symptom monitoring until the person they live with finishes isolation and then for an additional 10 days.

Cases are infectious for 10 days after the start of their symptoms or collection of positive test when asymptomatic. If masks are worn as indicated on days 6-10 of this period, CDC does not consider this an exposure. If cases cannot reliably wear a mask around others (including at home) during days 6-10, this could be considered an exposure. To reduce the risk of exposure, cases should follow CDC guidelines and: 

  • Continue to wear a well-fitting mask around others at home for 5 additional days (day 6 through day 10) after the end of your 5-day isolation period.
  • Avoid eating around others at home and at work until a full 10 days after your first day of symptoms.
     

Wearing a mask significantly lowers the risk, but similar to wearing a helmet while playing football or wearing a seatbelt in a car, they do not eliminate risk entirely. Therefore we cannot consider them to be fully protective. Masking alone is not sufficient protection - only when combined with social distancing (where possible) would someone not be considered a close contact.

Yes. Masks lower, but don't completely prevent, transmission. Cloth face coverings and surgical masks are designed to protect others from the person wearing it. Evidence is starting to emerge that the mask may protect the person wearing it from others, but more research is needed. Face coverings are not a substitute for maintaining distance and masks shouldn't be used alone. 

No. Only the person who was exposed to someone with COVID-19 needs to follow these precautions. If the person who was exposed were to test positive, the other household members should follow the post-exposure precautions. It's important for the person with the exposure remain separated from other household members to the greatest extent possible.

You do not need to be retested to leave isolation and return to school or work after having COVID-19. As long as you meet the criteria listed below you may leave isolation:

  • At least 5 days since symptoms started OR 5 days from a positive test if you have no symptoms
  • Symptoms are improving
  • Fever-free for 24-hours without using fever-reducing medicines (such as Ibuprofen)

Some symptoms may linger for a few days or weeks. So long as your symptoms are improving and you meet the other criteria, you may leave isolation.

It is possible to test positive for COVID-19 for up to 90 days after recovering, even though that person is no longer able to spread the virus to others. Therefore, testing is not recommended or needed to allow someone to return to work or school after being diagnosed with COVID-19.

Larimer County has partnered with the Health District to provide shelter, transportation, meals, and other needs for those who don’t have a safe place to stay during this time. To arrange a stay, call 970-530-2766.

We strongly encourage using a grocery delivery service if that's available in your area or having a family member, friend, or neighbor drop food off at your door if you know someone who would be willing to do that for you.

If you need assistance getting groceries or there isn't a delivery service available to you, Lutheran Family Services Rocky Mountains can provide assistance: 719-270-1464

Colorado 211 is also a helpful resource

  • Call 211
  • 211Colorado.org
  • Text your ZIP code to 898-211
  • Call toll-free 866-760-6489
  • Neighbor to Neighbor - www.n2n.org (Loveland/Berthoud only- go through Neighbor to Neighbor 1st)
    • Ft Collins: 970-484-7498
    • Loveland: 970-663-4163
  • Salvation Army  970-699-8380
  • Matthews House  970-472-4293
  • Murphy Center    970-494-9940
  • St Vincent DePaul  970-635-5809 

Being sick with or exposed to COVID may cause many different and strong emotions that may feel hard to manage on your own. There are many resources available to help. Click here for more information and for local resources that are available.

 


The Families First Coronavirus Response Act has been partially extended into 2021. The Emergency Paid Sick Leave Act states that employees are entitled to up to 80 hours of fully paid sick leave if they are absent due to COVID-19 related reasons. An additional 10 weeks of leave may be granted at 75% of usual pay. Additionally, the Emergency Family and Medical Leave Expansion Act, or the expanded FMLA, gives employees up to 12 weeks of leave in addition to the regular FMLA time, if you meet the eligibility requirements. This pay is tax refundable to your employer through March 31, 2021. If you have further questions, calling the people in charge of the payroll at your employer is the best way to go. If the situation covered by this Act doesn’t apply to you, you can also try calling the Colorado Unemployment Office. They have a call center for pandemic related assistance that is open Monday to Friday from 8am to 4pm. The number is: 303-536-5615.

If you are a CSU student, RamAid offers financial assistance of up to $1,000 to students who need help paying for things like food, rent, and medicine. If you can’t get paid time off, this might be a good option for you. You can apply through the Office of Financial Aid.  They can be reached by email: financialaid@colostate.edu or phone: 970-491-6321/

Cases are considered infectious during the 2 days prior to the start of their symptoms or positive test collection if asymptomatic [day 0] and for 10 full days after.

Cases are considered infectious for the 2 days prior to the start of their symptoms or positive test collection if asymptomatic [day 0] and for 10 full days after.

The following situations are considered an exposure:
-Contact (within 6 feet for more than 15 mins in 24 hours or other high risk activity), regardless of mask usage, with someone who is positive or presumed to be positive in the 2 days prior to their symptoms starting or positive test if asymptomatic (day 0) and the 5 days after. 
- Contact (within 6 feet for more than 15 mins in 24 hours or other high risk activity) with someone who is positive or presumed to be positive on days 6-10 after their symptoms starting or positive test if asymptomatic (day 0) and they were unmasked.


Take precautions including masking for 10 days while indoors and around others following your date of last exposure (day 0).